Port Clinton – Unusual Ice Formation in Ohio

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Sunshine Communities – Video

Sunshine Communities supports men, women and children with developmental disabilities, offering residential, vocational and clinical support as well as therapeutic and recreational programs.

The green river of Maumee – Short Film

ProMedica Frogtown rowers cut through algae.

While attending the ProMedica Frogtown Regatta on Saturday to watch my friend Louie Thaman compete, I had the idea to use my Phantom 3 drone to capture the event from a different perspective.

When I arrived to the Maumee River in Downtown Toledo, I noticed the water was very green and dirty. There was weird green algae in the river, and it looked very bad and contaminated. I stood at the base of the Anthony Wayne Bridge and prepared my drone to fly so I could take photos showing the rowers cutting through the algae.

I have been working with drones for about two years. I bought my drone because I wanted to produce music videos, provide publicity for companies, and also shoot documentaries in my country of Guatemala.

See more videos on my Youtube Channel —–> https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBRW4pHlxlodx0L3tBrDIYA?view_as=subscriber

First podcast: The English Corner

Podcast by Owens Community College Visual Storytelling student Hanssel Martinez on the English Corner class at Owens Community College. The English Corner, taught by Annette Clark, offers English lessons for free for international students. The podcast will be played on the OCCR station during our Voices of Storytelling show, and the Owens Outlook student online newspaper. Photo: A student learns English from instructor .

The English corner is very good program for International students and who are not students too, and this program help people to practice and learn the English Language. They had 12 to 15 students from different countrys and they are from, Iran, Russia, Colombia, Mexico, Africa, Venezuela, and Spain.

What is  a Podcast?

Podcasting is a form of audio broadcasting on the Internet. The reason it became linked with the iPod in name was because people download the broadcasts (audio shows) to listen to on their iPods. However you don’t have to listen to podcasts only on iPods; you can use your computer with some music software such as Windows built-in Media Player  or iTunes for mac (which has a podcast library), or your smartphone, or even in your car. It really doesn’t matter, as long as you have some way to play music on your computer you will be able to listen to podcasts.

Enterprise Photography

While I was in Atlanta with my family and friends we decided to go to the pumpkin event at Amicalola Falls State Park, and I captured this picture of girl choosing a little pumpkin.

In the event there were more than a thousand people enjoying a sunny day full of music and food where we all enjoyed the pumpkin festival in Atlanta, Georgia.

ISO: 800   Aperture:  22      Shutter: 1/320
ISO: 800          Aperture:  22         Shutter: 1/320

 

Feature Photography

A feature photo captures spontaneous, candid moments. It is the act of freezing shutter speeds of time. It is “a visual dessert to subscribers who digest a daily diet of accident, fire, political, and economic news.

Feature photography is timeless, although it can tell a story about specific time. Feature photography is the one category that encourages photojournalists to have fun when they are covering events, weather and their communities.

A hard rowing Practice

I decided to go to the rowing team  of St. John’s Jesuit school students. The rowing team is composed of many young people between 14 and 17 years old. The training was done in Michigan at Orchard Lake where it was a cold and rainy mist which was a challenge for these students since the water was very cold and the wind was strong which made it difficult to train.

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TEN COMMON WAYS TO CAPTURE A PICTURE IN PHOTOPERIODISM

The following photographs are part of my activity in my class of photo journalism in which I show the different techniques of photography more common and used in photojournalism.

In photojournalism several techniques are used to capture unique and interesting moments and some techniques are shown in my ten photographs for my visual storytelling assignment where we should use the different photography techniques like shallow depth of field, wide depth of field, stopped action, blurred action, panned action, rule of thirds, extreme perspective, silhouette, extreme lighting.

It was a bit difficult to take these pictures in manual mode, because it was a little complicated to capture your subject and get a good light compensation and focus of the subject. To get good results, you should practice several times and also play with the buttons on the camera. The most difficult part of these techniques was panned action which we should follow our subject with a slow shutter speed and at the same time have it in focus.

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THE GREEN RIVER OF THE GREAT MAUMEE

ProMedica Frogtown rowers cut through algae

While attending the ProMedica Frogtown Regatta on Saturday to watch my friend Louie Thaman compete, I had the idea to use my Phantom 3 drone to capture the event from a different perspective.

When I arrived to the Maumee River in Downtown Toledo, I noticed the water was very green and dirty. There was weird green algae in the river, and it looked very bad and contaminated. I stood at the base of the Anthony Wayne Bridge and prepared my drone to fly so I could take photos showing the rowers cutting through the algae.`

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How First Amendment works for students

What is the First Amendment?

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Public universities are particularly rich grounds for conflict over matters of speech. They bring together persons with often strongly held yet contradictory views. Universities, for example, have their own newspapers, some of which may be operated by the university, by the students or by an off-campus group. Public institutions in their diversity often have students and faculty of different political persuasions, sexual orientations, and religious commitments. Moreover, one of the driving concepts of the university campus is academic freedom, the right to inquire broadly, to question and to promote an environment where wrong answers, seemingly absurd ideas and unconventional thought are not just permitted but even encouraged.

But the issue of free expression on campus goes beyond speech codes and involves a host of other matters. They include outspoken university faculty; technologically mediated discussions that, through the internet, transcend the requirements of time and place so essential to traditional First Amendment analysis; visiting speakers expressing controversial views; the use of student fees to support gay, lesbian and other organizations; the reporting and editorializing of the campus newspaper; artistic expression; and the faculty’s freedom to pursue, publish and proclaim their research findings. In each of these instances, the underlying issue for a university is its duty to teach its students the lessons of responsibility that accompany the privilege of academic freedom. As photo journalism students, we can take photographs on and off the campus of our university and obtain the necessary information to inform and transmit a message to the public through the newspaper or the website of our university.

The various ways of exercising journalism, whether through images, words or ideas, can be valid or questionable according to the journalist’s ideology. By recording a fact and communicating it the photographer reflects his personal way of seeing. Choose a point of view. The content of his message is framed in his own convictions or moral norms.

A step beyond editing, which as we have seen is lawful and acceptable when done without excess and with common sense, is the manipulation, where the image is adulterated. That is, they remove or add elements to distort the reality captured for some purpose. A subject, incidentally, that is not precisely recent and has been present throughout the history of photography.